Cannabis in the Liquor Store?

By Cori Petersen

cannabisstocks“INVEST IN THOSE ALREADY IN THE GAME WITH KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE. NOT BY TRYING TO BUY THEM OUT OR SWALLOW THEM UP INTO YOUR COLLECTIVE, BUT BY ASKING THEM WHAT THEY MIGHT LIKE TO BE INVOLVED IN? ARE THEY WILLING TO LET YOU INVEST IN THEM?“

When one thinks of recreation vs medicinal, the idea of want vs need may come to mind. Along with that… a definition of what makes something medical or for fun. The muddling of that has never seemed worse that it is today.

After the announcement from the BC Government Employee’ Union and BC Liquor Store Association that they wanted to sell Cannabis, media has lit up with the issue, (social and traditional alike).

Andrew Livingston, a policy analyst from Colorado told the CBC recently that legislators in Canada are going to have to balance demands from the first crop of Cannabis retailers as well as the newest crop – like liquor stores, precious metal miners and investment bankers who want to foray into the Canna-frey.

“You already have these brick and mortar establishments and they have already tight regulations and systems of distribution,” Livingston said in an interview from Denver.

“But you also don’t want to necessarily sideline those medical marijuana dispensaries that have been operating legitimately within their communities, in some cases, for decades.” Livingston said.

On the BC Government and Employee’ Union website, in a December 2nd press release, BCGEU president stated that, “B.C. needs to ensure that non-medical marijuana is retailed in the most socially responsible way possible. Liquor stores provide the most strictly controlled system for accessing a controlled substance, and are best suited for the retailing of non-medical marijuana. We have an effective warehousing, retail and distribution system in place, there is no need to reinvent the wheel,” Stephanie Smith said.

And she is right about one thing… not needing to reinvent the wheel. Even a prize winning horticulturist of flowers or vegetables has trouble adapting their practices to Cannabis. Not that Cannabis is that difficult to grow. Producing a consistent quality product on the other hand is whole other matter. Mega industrial scale growing tends not to yield as desirable Cannabis that smaller rooms do. Not that a large room can’t make beauty buds, however like a student teacher ratio makes a world of difference, so does the attention abundance each plant can receive on smaller scale grow that is conducive to an artisan bud.

Invest in those already in the game with knowledge and experience. Not by trying to buy them out or swallow them up into your collective… but by asking them what they might like to be involved in and if they are willing to let you invest in them.

Most medicinal users of Cannabis will tell you that all use is recreational as well as medical. Eventually the science may bear this out.

When we look at how the Canadian government defines recreation, (it seems a bit vague as to whether recreation is a need or want).

“Recreation is the positive actions and choices we make to recreate, to restore and refresh body, mind and spirit… the personal, social, economic, and environmental benefits of recreation are the essence of a healthy community and individual well-being. Recreation creates opportunities for people to be active, offering diverse and enjoyable ways to stay healthy.”

Officials go so far some provinces to state that “RECREATION is ESSENTIAL to [their] quality of life.”

The lines seem blurred even further when one asks at which point during the cultivation process or curing does the substance become medicinal? Is it when they put on a white lab coat to grow it?

Recent reports that the Federal government will not instruct the RCMP to cease its RAIDS on medical Cannabis locations leads the community to much speculation and some fear as to what the future of Cannabis will be.

When did growing flowers become so dangerous?

World Cannabis is currently awaiting a comment from Don Briere on this matter.

Come back soon to find out Mr. Briere’s take on what he thinks it will require for a legitimate Cannabis industry to effectively snuff out the black market?

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